Thumb_logo_white Discover Create Go Pro
Log In / Sign Up
Lowdown Harmonica Blues from Jackson, Mississippi, Hour 2
Clean
February 28, 2015 07:30 AM PST
itunes pic

Join us as we take a ride down to the “City with Soul,” Jackson, Mississippi, to hear some lowdown blues harmonica. We’ll hear from the master, Sonny Boy Williamson, and some all time classics that were recorded for Jackson’s very own Trumpet label. In addition, we’ll also hear from a handful of other homegrown enterprises — Ace and Champion (Johnny Vincent), plus, the short-lived Delta label. In addition to Sonny Boy and his Trumpet Records pals (Elmore James and Arthur Crudup), we’ll also hear from Jerry "Boogie" McCain, Papa Lightfoot, Sam Myers, and a handful more. It’s lowdown harmonica from Jackson, Mississippi, on this episode of Blues Unlimited.

Pictured: "Natchez Trace," recorded in Jackson, Mississippi, was George “Papa” Lightfoot’s very last LP.

Lowdown Harmonica Blues from Jackson, Mississippi, Hour 1
Clean
February 28, 2015 07:09 AM PST
itunes pic
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT!

Well, we're beginning to wonder if anyone really reads these little love notes, but if you're out there and you do..... here's the bottom line: The continuation of this program is dependent upon money coming in from radio stations who pick up the show for local broadcast. Without radio stations purchasing the show, this enterprise comes to a grinding halt. So, that's where YOU come in!

Blues Unlimited - The Radio Show needs a Marketing Director! This will be a strictly commission-based position. The ideal candidate will have experience in sales and radio. Since you’re a regular listener of this program, it’s also assumed that you have some knowledge and appreciation of the blues as well.

As the chief cook and bottle washer, I don’t have time to market the show. This is where you come in. You’ll be pretty much on your own, and left to your own devices. The bottom line - you’ll get paid when I get paid. Rate of commission to be worked out between the two of us.

The job is really what you want to make of it. Whether it be selling the program to radio stations, looking for corporate sponsors (or both).... grant writing..... government funding..... or any other creative ides you might have.

If interested - please don’t send a resume - please send an email to ( b l u e s u n l i m i t e d a t g m a i l d o t c o m ) and let me know some of your thoughts and ideas. And now.... on with the show!

Join us as we take a ride down to Jackson, Mississippi, to hear some lowdown harmonica. We’ll hear from the master — Sonny Boy Williamson, plus, Papa Lightfoot, Sam Myers, Jerry "Boogie" McCain and many more. It’s lowdown harmonica from Jackson, Mississippi, on this episode of Blues Unlimited.

Pictured: Sonny Boy Williamson, who was not only a wizard with the harmonica, but also with the pen -- writing some of the most beloved blues songs of all time.

A Conversation With The Blues (Hour 2)
Clean
February 19, 2015 07:03 AM PST
itunes pic

At the risk of sounding like a broken record.... IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: Blues Unlimited is looking for a Marketing Director!

Blues Unlimited - The Radio Show needs a Marketing Director! This will be a strictly commission-based position. The ideal candidate will have experience in sales and radio. Since you’re a regular listener of this program, it’s also assumed that you have some knowledge and appreciation of the blues as well.

As the chief cook and bottle washer, I don’t have time to market the show. This is where you come in. You’ll be pretty much on your own, and left to your own devices. The bottom line - you’ll get paid when I get paid. Rate of commission to be worked out between the two of us.

The job is really what you want to make of it. Whether it be selling the program to radio stations, looking for corporate sponsors (or both).... grant writing..... government funding..... or any other creative ides you might have.

If interested - please don’t send a resume - please send an email to ( b l u e s u n l i m i t e d a t g m a i l d o t c o m ) and let me know some of your thoughts and ideas. And now.... on with the show!

NOTE: This program contains strong and potentially offensive language. Listener discretion is advised.

Join us as we revisit two legendary albums. The first, a "Conversation With The Blues," was recorded by Paul Oliver during the summer of 1960. The second, "Blues In The Mississippi Night," is a haunting documentary recorded by Alan Lomax in 1947. A conversation with the Blues — on this episode of Blues Unlimited.

A Conversation With The Blues (Hour 1)
Clean
February 19, 2015 06:50 AM PST
itunes pic
NOTE: This program contains strong and potentially offensive language. Listener discretion is advised.

Many critics would agree that one of the finest books about the Blues is one by Paul Oliver called "Conversation With The Blues." To say that it is by Paul Oliver, however, is slightly misleading — like many similar books by Studs Terkel, it is actually an oral history of the Blues, spoken directly from the hearts and minds of the musicians who lived that life, told in a matter-of-fact, straightforward, and unadorned fashioned. Oliver collected these interviews during the summer of 1960, when he made an extensive sweep through the United States, gathering stories by Blues musicians from practically every walk of life. It took five years to transcribe the tapes that finally appeared in the book, and along with it, of course, came a companion LP of the same name. In 1997, after years of being out of print, the Cambridge University Press finally issued a second edition of the book, along with a companion CD, which contained a slightly different running order than did the original 1965 LP. On this episode, we'll be featuring most of the original LP, along with a couple of bonus selections from the 1997 Compact Disc.

The other album in the spotlight is one steeped in legend. One Sunday afternoon in March 1947, in New York City, Alan Lomax took Big Bill Broonzy, Memphis Slim, and John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson down to a recording studio, turned on a tape machine (actually, it was a rather primitive disc cutting machine), and sat back and watched while the three men talked frankly and openly about their lives — the first time they had ever done so in front of a microphone.

The recordings they made that day and the stories they told are nothing less than deeply moving and stunning -- at times, a jaw-dropping testament to the lives they'd all lived back in the south, before heading north to Chicago to pursue the life of a musician. And when Alan Lomax did a playback of the afternoon's events for these three titans of the Blues, they were literally terrified. Fearing reprisals and retribution on their loved ones back home for what they had said, Alan Lomax agreed never to issue the recordings during their lifetimes using their real names. It wasn't until 1990, when Rykodisc issued Blues In The Mississippi Night, that they were finally issued — for the first time — without using pseudonyms.

For the uninitiated, the stories on tonight's program are sometimes hard to take. The language is often coarse, brutal, and matter of fact. But after experiencing the stories you will hear on tonight's program, you will never think about the Blues — or the people who lived that life — the same way ever again.

Pictured: The original 1957 release of "Blues in the Mississippi Night."

Talking While the Music's Playing: Narrative Traditions in the Blues (Hour 2)
Clean
February 10, 2015 10:16 AM PST
itunes pic

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: Blues Unlimited is looking for a Marketing Director!

Blues Unlimited - The Radio Show needs a Marketing Director! This will be a strictly commission-based position. The ideal candidate will have experience in sales and radio. Since you’re a regular listener of this program, it’s also assumed that you have some knowledge and appreciation of the blues as well.

As the chief cook and bottle washer, I don’t have time to market the show. This is where you come in. You’ll be pretty much on your own, and left to your own devices. The bottom line - you’ll get paid when I get paid. Rate of commission to be worked out between the two of us.

The job is really what you want to make of it. Whether it be selling the program to radio stations, looking for corporate sponsors (or both).... grant writing..... government funding..... or any other creative ides you might have.

If interested - please don’t send a resume - please send an email to ( b l u e s u n l i m i t e d a t g m a i l d o t c o m ) and let me know some of your thoughts and ideas. And now.... on with the show!

Join us as we take a look at narrative traditions in the blues. Starting with Speckled Red in 1929, we’ll hear classics along the way from Bo Diddley, Jack McVea, Pigmeat Markham, Robert Pete Williams, and B.B. King. It’s a whole program dedicated to talking while the music's playing — on this episode of Blues Unlimited.

Pictured: A huge 1947 crossover hit, the catchphrase, "Open the Door Richard," quickly wound its way into American popular culture.

Talking While the Music's Playing: Narrative Traditions in the Blues (Hour 1)
Clean
February 10, 2015 08:46 AM PST
itunes pic

Join us as we take a look at narrative traditions in the blues. Starting with Speckled Red in 1929, we’ll hear classics along the way from Bo Diddley, Jack McVea, Pigmeat Markham, Robert Pete Williams, and B.B. King. More than just a cursory "Roots of Rap and Hip-Hop" history lesson, we'll dig into ground-breaking hits like "The Dirty Dozen," "The Hambone" and "Open The Door Richard," the latter of which captured the pop zeitgeist of 1947. Twenty years later, it was Pigmeat Markham and "Here Comes The Judge" (think "Laugh-In," the comedy TV show); another big hit that, in retrospect, easily comes across as an early Rap record. And while Bo Diddley and Jerome Green may have taken the fine art of trading insults to a whole new level with their ongoing series ("Say Man," "Say Man, Back Again," "Signifying Blues,") other spoken passages on the program come from a deeper place within. "Prisoner's Talking Blues" by Robert Pete Williams is one of the most moving pieces ever recorded — in any genre — while "Lucille" is a touching tribute to one of the most enduring relationships the Blues has ever known — B.B. King and his guitar Lucille. And finally, if you're a die-hard blues fan, you probably won't need a cue card to recite right along with John Lee Hooker during the spoken passages of "Boogie Chillen," the massive number one hit that put him on the map in the late 1940s.

As it turns out, there's a long and proud tradition of "Talking While the Music's Playing," and on this special episode of Blues Unlimited, we've pulled out a couple dozen of our favorites.

Pictured: The late, great Bo Diddley, on his signature Gretsch guitar. Along with his maracas-shaking partner, Jerome Green, the two of them giggled, wisecracked and laughed their way through a series of ground-breaking recordings for the Checker label.

Drop Down Mama: The Desert Island Classics, Part 3 (Hr 2)
Clean
February 03, 2015 08:40 AM PST
itunes pic

Join us as we continue with another installment of Desert Island Classics, this time around, putting a legendary slice of vinyl, "Drop Down Mama," into the spotlight. Issued 1970, it comes from a group of LPs compiled by Tom Swan, called the "Chess Vintage Series." Along the way, we'll also enjoy a few Chicago postwar favorites from John Brim and Elmore James ("Whose Muddy Shoes"), J.B. Lenoir ("Natural Man"), and Jimmy Rogers ("Chicago Bound"), who were also featured in the series as well. It’s Desert Island Classics from Chess, on this episode of "Blues Unlimited."

Special thanks to Dick Shurman, Scott Dirks, and the Red Saunders Research Foundation for help and assistance!

Pictured: A classic slice of vinyl from the Chess catalog, "Drop Down Mama." Issued 1970 as part of the "Chess Vintage Series."

Drop Down Mama: The Desert Island Classics, Part 3 (Hr 1)
Clean
February 03, 2015 08:15 AM PST
itunes pic

YOUR HELP IS NEEDED!!! Please take a moment to read the following....

Blues Unlimited DESPERATELY NEEDS NEW RADIO STATIONS to adopt the show! IF WE CANNOT GET MORE RADIO STATIONS TO CARRY THE SHOW, WE WILL NOT BE ABLE TO CONTINUE PRODUCING NEW EPISODES OF BLUES UNLIMITED. Sorry to shout, but yes, it's basically that simple. Is there an NPR or Community Radio station near you that has a diverse schedule, or that maybe plays some jazz in the evenings? Please write or call them and TELL THEM ABOUT OUR SHOW. Radio stations listen when you speak up. In the process, you will be doing us a great favor as well. And for those who live overseas..... same thing! We would love to be picked up in England, Canada, Australia, or any other place that would love to have some great blues on their schedule. Thanks for bearing with us while we take care of a little business, and now..... on with the show!!!

Join us as we continue with another installment of Desert Island Classics, this time around, putting a legendary slice of vinyl, "Drop Down Mama," into the spotlight. Issued 1970, it comes from a group of LPs compiled by Tom Swan, called the "Chess Vintage Series." Along the way, we'll also enjoy a few Chicago postwar favorites from John Brim, Elmore James, J.B. Lenoir, and Jimmy Rogers, who were also featured in the series as well. It’s Desert Island Classics from Chess, on this episode of "Blues Unlimited."

Three from Imperial: The Desert Island Classics, Pt 2 (Hr 2)
Clean
January 26, 2015 08:17 AM PST
itunes pic

Join us for another installment of "Desert Island Classics." This time, we turn the spotlight on three LPs that came out on the Imperial label in 1968, called "Rural Blues." Compiled by Bob "The Bear" Hite and Henry Vestine of Canned Heat, almost 50 years later, they’re still considered essential listening. We'll hear selections from Volume 1, subtitled "Goin' Up The Country;" Volume 2, "Saturday Night Function;" and Volume 3, "Down Home Stomp." Includes music from Lightnin' Hopkins, Thunder Smith, Clifton Chenier, Lil' Son Jackson, J.D. Edwards, Papa Lightfoot, Slim Harpo, Snooks Eaglin, Boogie Bill Webb, and more.

Pictured: Issued 1968, each of the three volumes of "Rural Blues" were compiled by Canned Heat members Bob Hite and Henry Vestine.

Three from Imperial: The Desert Island Classics, Pt 2 (Hr 1)
Clean
January 26, 2015 07:42 AM PST
itunes pic

YOUR HELP IS NEEDED!!! Please take a moment to read the following....

Blues Unlimited DESPERATELY NEEDS NEW RADIO STATIONS to adopt the show! IF WE CANNOT GET MORE RADIO STATIONS TO CARRY THE SHOW, WE WILL NOT BE ABLE TO CONTINUE PRODUCING NEW EPISODES OF BLUES UNLIMITED. Sorry to shout, but yes, it's basically that simple. Is there an NPR or Community Radio station near you that has a diverse schedule, or that maybe plays some jazz in the evenings? Please write or call them and TELL THEM ABOUT OUR SHOW. Radio stations listen when you speak up. In the process, you will be doing us a great favor as well. And for those who live overseas..... same thing! We would love to be picked up in England, Canada, Australia, or any other place that would love to have some great blues on their schedule. Thanks for bearing with us while we take care of a little business, and now..... on with the show!!!

Join us for another installment of "Desert Island Classics." This time, we turn the spotlight on three LPs that came out on the Imperial label in 1968, called "Rural Blues." Compiled by Bob "The Bear" Hite and Henry Vestine of Canned Heat, almost 50 years later, they’re still considered essential listening. It's three classic LPs from Imperial, on this episode of Blues Unlimited.

Next Page